Category: Conferences

Registration Open for #Ludo2017

We’re delighted to announce that registration for Ludo2017 is now open!

Details on registration, travel, accommodation and the preliminary programme are on this page here. To go straight to registration, please click the button below!

Register

We look forward to joining you in Bath for what promises to be a really exciting event!

Melanie, Michiel, Tim, Mark

Ludo 2017

Ludo2017, the Sixth Easter Conference on Video Game Music and Sound, will take place April 20th – 22nd at Bath Spa University, UK.

The draft Conference Booklet is now available.

Please share our Call for Papers poster online and around your institutions.

The sixth annual Easter conference is focused on the theme of ‘Performance’, understood in the broadest sense. The conference will feature keynote addresses by:

  • Kenneth McAlpine (Abertay University), author of Bits and Pieces: A History of Chiptunes (OUP, 2017),
  • Roger Moseley (Cornell University), author of the recently published Keys to Play: Music as a Ludic Medium from Apollo to Nintendo (UC Press, 2017), and
  • Rob Hubbard, best known for his groundbreaking compositions for the Commodore 64 (Commando, International Karate, Monty on the Run, Skate or Die).

The programme also includes a concert of new compositions inspired by, and using, game audio technology, curated by Professor James Saunders, organizer of the Open Scores Lab.

Registration

Please register on the Bath Spa website, here.

Register

Accommodation

You can book University accommodation when completing your registration for the conference. Alternatively, you may book accommodation separately. Unfortunately, there isn’t central campus accommodation for the night of the 19th (with apologies), but other options are available below, including the Green Park House accommodation owned by the uni http://www.greenparkhouse.co.uk/our-accommodation/.

We can recommend the following options:

Location & Travel

The conference will take place at Bath Spa’s Newton Park Campus. Bath Spa University have more detailed directions on their website. The nearest international airport is Bristol (40 mins by car), but and Heathrow (1hr 50mins) is not far. Bath Spa Railway Station can be reached by the U5 bus from campus, where you can get regular direct trains to London Paddington (1hr 30mins). The U5 leaves every 10 minutes during daytime on weekdays, every 60 minutes in the evening, and every 30 minutes on weekends. See the bus company website for more details and a detailed map of public transport in and around Bath.

Limited parking is available at the Newton Park campus. More information can be found here.

If you have any queries regarding registration, please contact us at ludomusicology@gmail.com.

Preliminary Programme

This draft programme is subject to change.

Day 1: 20th April 2017

9:00 – 09:30 Registration, Coffee & Welcome
09:30 – 11:35 Session 1Algorithms and Voices
11:35 – 12:00 Coffee Break
12:00 – 13:00 Keynote 1 (Kenneth McAlpine)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 15:50 Session 2 – Compositions with Game Technology
15:50 – 16:20 Tea & Coffee Break
16:20 – 17:50 Session 3 – Realities and Spaces
 18:00 – 18:30  Drinks Reception
 19:30  Conference Dinner

Day 2, 21st April 2017

9:30 – 11:35 Session 4Histories
11:35 – 12:00 Tea & Coffee Break
12:00 – 13:00 Keynote 2 (Rob Hubbard)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 15:50 Session 5Play Beyond the Game
16:00 – 16:30 Tea & Coffee Break
16:20 – 17:50 Session 6 – Performance
 18:30 Evening Celebration – Concert

Day 3, 22nd April 2017

9:30 – 11:35 Session 7 – In Concert
11:35 – 12:00 Tea & Coffee Break
12:00 – 13:00 Keynote 3 (Roger Moseley)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 15:30 Session 8 – Sonic Worlds
15:30 – 16:00 Tea & Coffee Break
16:00 – 17:30 Session 9 – Teaching and Learning

 

bath_spa_university_logo-svg

www.ludomusicology.org | #ludo2017
Hosted by Professor James Newman, Bath Spa University.
Organized by Melanie Fritsch, Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers, Mark Sweeney.

Ludo 2017 Call for Papers

We’re delighted to announce that Ludo2017, the Sixth Easter Conference on Video Game Music and Sound, will take place April 20th – 22nd at Bath Spa University, UK.

 

Please share our Call for Papers poster online and around your institutions.

The organizers of Ludo2017 are accepting proposals for research presentations at the sixth annual Easter conference. While we welcome all proposals on sound and music in games, we are particularly interested in papers that support the theme of ‘Performance’, understood in the broadest sense. Possible topics on this theme include:

  • Chips and sonic outputs,
  • Playing with, and within, technological audio constructs,
  • Sound and ludic interaction,
  • Histories of developing techniques and tools,
  • Game audio aesthetics and approaches,
  • Composition with game technologies (chips, engines, etc.).

Presentations should last twenty minutes, to be followed by questions. Please submit your paper proposal (c.250 words) by email to ludomusicology@gmail.com by January 31st 2017.

Composers and practitioners may also submit a proposal to present work at the conference.

bath_spa_university_logo-svgWe also welcome session proposals from organizers representing two to four individuals; the organizer should submit an introduction to the theme and c.200 word proposals for each paper.

The conference will feature a keynote address by Kenneth McAlpine (Abertay University), author of Bits and Pieces: A History of Chiptunes (OUP, 2017), with further keynote speakers and guests to be announced shortly.

www.ludomusicology.org | #ludo2017
Hosted by Professor James Newman, Bath Spa University.
Organized by Melanie Fritsch, Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers, Mark Sweeney.

#Ludo2016 Conference Review

We are proud to publish the following review as part of our contributor articles series. Feel free to leave comments, and do let us know if you would like to send us articles to share with the wider community!

Contributor: Sebastian Urrea

I came into Ludo 2016 as a newcomer, not knowing quite what to expect. I was coming down from an extraordinary experience visiting London and the surrounding area during the week leading up to the conference, and I was excited to see what it would be like. I didn’t know anyone, I wasn’t in academia, hadn’t done research, and I didn’t have any papers to present. I just loved video game music. I had studied music, and enjoyed theory and musicology, and had applied it to video game music on my own. I was thrilled when I learned that there were others who were doing similar things in an academic setting. I had been planning a trip that happened to align perfectly to allow me to be in England at the time of the conference. So on a whim I had registered, hoping to see what I could learn and who I could meet.

What I found exceeded my expectations in many ways. First, the papers. The presentations included discussions and examinations of a very diverse body of music, and everyone had a different way of examining their chosen interest. Papers included discussions of classic JRPGs and Nintendo games through old arcade games, indie games, hip hop, horror games, and new virtual reality games. Some papers looked backward, at history and culture, and some looked forward, to innovations in the field and new possibilities for integrating music and games. I learned about music that I had never really listened to (for instance, arcade music of the 70s and 80s), and I learned about new music that I didn’t even know about (Elise Plans and David Plans’ discussion on new developments in music and biofeedback in games makes me excited to see what the future of video game music holds).

At first I was disappointed that the presentations didn’t include more subjects with which I was familiar. But really, that would have been less interesting. I learned a lot more from the really diverse set of presentations than I would have otherwise. The topics discussed had a great balance across different aspects of video game music, and I am certain that anyone in attendance would have found things both familiar and new.

Amongst such diverse music, everyone focused on something different. Discussions ranged from the analytical (James Tate’s examination of the musical style of Jeremy Soule, or Morgan Hale’s analysis of the music of Undertale), to cultural/ethnomusicological (Hyeonjin Park’s discussion of musical representations of deserts across games, or Keith Hennigan’s critique of Irish music in video games), to technical (Blake Troise’s discussion of compositional techniques with NES hardware), and more. It made me really appreciate how diverse and expansive video game music really is, and how much opportunity there is to delve into different topics and explore and discover new things.

The choices of keynotes were excellent. Having someone like Andrew Barnabas in attendance with such a history of work in the industry was thrilling to everyone. It allowed for a bridge between the theoretical and academic to the practical, and was a good learning opportunity for everyone involved. It also gave rise to some great discussions (did you know he was responsible for adding the snippet of singing in “A Whole New World” in the video game version of Aladdin?). Neil Lerner’s talk of Pac-Man and its sounds was a great reminder of the technical aspects of video game music, and how it can be important to consider how they factor in to composition and production.

Spending time with everyone outside of presentations was equally as fun. Many of the attendees were already friends from previous conferences or from shared work. But most importantly, Ludo 2016 provided a friendly, open atmosphere to everyone involved. After all, we were all there because we were critically interested in a pretty geeky and new area of music, and this conference created a unique opportunity for everyone to explore that interest freely and openly. The fact that any of us could immediately go up to someone and express our interests, by saying something like, “Hey, have you played this game?” or “Did you ever listen to the soundtrack from this other game?” made for a really unique and refreshing experience. When presenting, the whole group was engaged in every talk, giving positive feedback and sharing knowledge from their own areas of specialty. And I think everyone who attended the pub trivia quiz night enjoyed being stumped by the questions that were just as diverse as the presentations that were given.

Looking back at the conference, my biggest takeaway is my impression that the field of video game music is really a lot broader than I had realized. I had my own interests that I had honed in on, but seeing so many people studying such a range of topics was inspiring. I left feeling that there is a lot of potential to be explored in studying music from a range of games larger than I had realized, and in ways that I had never even considered. I have a lot of faith in the people who attended the conference and who are dedicating themselves to studying it, each in their own way and with their own perspectives, and it makes me excited to see what the future of Ludomusicology will be as it continues to grow. I look forward to what future Ludo conferences will bring!

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