Tag: Ludomusicology

Just Published! Ludomusicology: Approaches to Video Game Music, Edited by Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers and Mark Sweeney

We are thrilled to announce that our volume, Ludomusicology Approaches to Video Game Music has just published! Supplementary materials to the book will be published on our website soon, so look forward to a further announcement about that in the coming weeks.

The last half-decade has seen the rapid and expansive development of video game music studies. As with any new area of study, this significant sub-discipline is still tackling fundamental questions concerning how video game music should be approached. In this volume, experts in game music provide their responses to these issues.

This book suggests a variety of new approaches to the study of game music. In the course of developing ways of conceptualizing and analyzing game music it explicitly considers other critical issues including the distinction between game play and music play, how notions of diegesis are complicated by video game interactivity, the importance of cinema aesthetics in game music, the technicalities of game music production and the relationships between game music and art music traditions.

This collection is accessible, yet theoretically substantial and complex. It draws upon a diverse array of perspectives and presents new research which will have a significant impact upon the way that game music is studied. The volume represents a major development in game musicology and will be indispensable for both academic researchers and students of game music.

Ludomusicology-Equinox2016Cover

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
    Michiel Kamp, Tim Summers, Mark Sweeney
  2. Analyzing Video Game Music: Sources, Methods and a Case Study
    Tim Summers
  3. Analyzing Game Musical Immersion: The ALI Model
    Isabella van Elferen, Kingston University, London
  4. Modularity in Video Game Music
    Elizabeth Medina-Gray, Independent Scholar
  5. Suture and Peritexts: Music Beyond Gameplay and Diegesis
    Michiel Kamp
  6. “It’s a-me, Mario!” – Playing With Video Game Music
    Melanie Fritsch, Independent Scholar
  7. Game and Play in Music Video Games
    Anahid Kassabian, Independent Scholar, and Freya Jarman, University of Liverpool
  8. ‘Listening’ Through Digital Interaction in Björk’s Biophilia
    Samantha Blickhan, PhD Candidate
  9. Palimpsest, Pragmatism and the Aesthetics of Genre Transformation: Composing the Hybrid Score to Electronic Arts’s Need for Speed Shift 2: Unleashed
    Stephen Baysted, University of Chichester
  10. Isaac’s Silence Purposive Aesthetics in Dead Space
    Mark Sweeney, University of Oxford
  11. Remixed Metaphors: Manipulating Classical Music and Its Meanings in Video Games
    William Gibbons, Texas Christian University

Thank you to all of our fantastic chapter authors for your hard work in bringing this volume together.

Technical Details

hb ISBN 9781781791974
£60 / $100
pb ISBN 9781781791981
£19.99 / $29.95
Pub date: July 2016
Extent: 240pp 15 Figures
Format: 234 x 156mm (9.21 x 6.14 inches)
Readership: scholars and students
Subjects: Popular Music
Series: Genre, Music and Sound

Receive 25% off quoting the code Ludo when ordering from the Equinox book page. To find out more about the book and to order visit:

https://www.equinoxpub.com/home/ludomusicology/

 

AHRC Videogame Research Networks

ahrc-logo-forwebAs many in the UK will no doubt be aware, the AHRC recently released a press release entitled ‘Game changing research networks for the Video game industry’. The research council is now supporting six new research networks dedicated to videogames, including Guitar Heroes in Music Education? Music-based video-games and their potential for musical and performative creativity, led by David Roesner at the University of Kent. The press release states that:

The network seeks to investigate the impact of music-games on how we define music-making, creativity and identity and what opportunities this provides for artist and teachers. In order to do so, the network will connect relevant arts and humanities academics with both game designers and musicians, who have embraced the soft- and hardwares of gaming for creating new ways of composing and performing. The network also seeks to explore the creative potential and influence these games will have on future game design and how these could be implemented in music education.

This is unquestionably an excellent sign for the development of the field, and we look forward to seeing the fruits of their labour.

Interview with a Ludomusicologist

In July, Game Informer published an interview with ludomusicologist Ryan Thompson from the University of Minnesota.  It is an interesting read to hear how the field is developing on the other side of the Atlantic.

Ludomusicology Conference 2013: Call for Papers

We are very pleased to announce our 2013 Conference will be held at Liverpool University at Easter.  Please help to distribute our Call for Papers (PDF) and spread the word!  Further details will be added here over the coming weeks.

%d bloggers like this: